Woodland Spring Wildflowers: An Update

In late April and early May, most of the wildflowers blooming in the park are found in the woods. This is changing; from now on, most blooms will be in the more sunny areas.

On my walk on May 21, I took a look at what remained of the spring woodland flowers.

Trillium is still blooming, but fading.

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Wild Geranium is at its peak, now the most prominent flower along the path through the woods.

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While earlier the Mayapple was recognized by its foliage, the single flower per plant is now open (though one needs to get down close to the ground to get a good look.

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Violets were plentiful in Eliza Howell this year, both in and outside the woods, and they came in a variety of species/colors.

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Now the few remaining blooming violets in the woods are the white ones. It is noteworthy that the plants are now much taller and the leaves larger than when blooming began.

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This may be my last walk of the year focused on woodland wildflowers. Overall, 2018 was not a great early wildflower year, the probable result of the weather – a cold April and a wet May. But the flowers will come again next year and I hope to be ready to greet and welcome them.

 

Earliest Spring Wildflowers: Eliza Howell Park

2018 has been cold in March and early April, but the weather will get warmer and wildflowers will soon start to bloom.

Those who have the opportunity to walk in the park looking for blooming flowers this spring may see the following in late April or the beginning of May.

This 11-flower list is not all-inclusive, but it might provide some guidance to spring flower seekers.

All photos are from Eliza Howell Park.

  1. Spring Beauty
  • Woods
  • 3 – 6 inches
  • Usually 5 petals marked with pink or purple vein

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2. Cutleaf Toothwort

  • Woods
  • 8 – 12 inches
  • 4 petals

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3. Yellow Trout Lily

  • Woods
  • 6 – 10 inches
  • 6 backward curving petals

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4. White Trout Lily (Dogtooth Violet)

  • Woods
  • 6 – 10 inches
  • 6 backward curving petals

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5. Common Blue Violet

  • Woods and meadows
  • 3 – 8 inches
  • 5 petals

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6. Canada (white) Violet

  • Woods
  • 6 -15 inches
  • 5 petals, lower 3 marked with fine brown-purple veins

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7. Garlic Mustard

  • Woods
  • 1 – 4 feet
  • 4 petals
  • Non-native plant

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8. Wild Strawberry

  • Meadows, open areas
  • 3 – 6 inches
  • 5 rounds petals, numerous yellow stamens

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9. Wild Geranium

  • Woods
  • 1 – 2 feet
  • 5 petals, usually with dark veins

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10. (Common) Trillium

  • Woods
  • 12 – 18 inches
  • 3 large petals
  • Protected Michigan wildflower

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11. Redbud

  • Edges of woods
  • Small tree, native of North America
  • Flowers are pea-shaped and appear on twigs and branches

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